Author Archive for Robin

The Golden Vine

An ambitious, visually stunning work, The Golden Vine is also a study of history’s possibilities. The book focuses on one of the more enigmatic figures of the world’s past: Alexander the Great, that rebellious Macdeonian prince who conquered the bulk…

Scion, vol. 3: Divided Loyalties

Ethan’s world is getting both more complicated and simpler at once. As he flees North to escape his enemies, accompanied by the daughter of the Raven Clan Ashleigh, he is faced with the inhuman experiments and cruelty that his own…

Inu-Yasha: A Feudal Fairytale, vol. 1

The world-renowned author of Ranma 1/2 creates the equally delightful Inu-Yasha, a magical adventure set in Feudal Japan complete with animal demons, reincarnation, destiny, and a pesky half-demon dog boy Inu-Yasha. Kagome, tired of listening to her grandfather’s endless stories…

Hopeless Savages, vol. 2: Ground Zero

Hopeless Savages remains one of my favorite books simply for its exuberant punk family dynamics, youngest daughter’s Zero’s creative (non)swear words, and tribute to the power of music. In this second volume, it also made me get all mushy. This…

Decoy

Little green men. It’s an image we all carry around with us, like the Coke symbol and Armstrong landing on the Moon. The inescapable expectation that aliens will somehow appear as little green men rather than, say, rocks of black…

Blankets

The test for any good book is simple: can you put it down easily after you’ve started reading? Is there a sense of loss every time you stop reading? Well, with Craig Thompson’s Blankets, it passed this test with flying…

Skinwalker

Just to be clear from the start: this is not a comic version of a Tony Hillerman novel. Skinwalker does combine some of the same elements of those tales: grim Navajo legends apparently come to life, a reluctant partnership, this…

Batman: Child of Dreams

This title, in many ways, is a clever mix of ideas. Famed Japanese manga and anime creator Kia Asamiya tackles one of our most distinctly American heroes, Batman. DC Comics handed the keys to Gotham over and brought in Max…

Cheat

I will admit, I fell in love with Ms. Norrie’s artwork when I read the first Hopeless Savages. Cheat is her first solo book, and her artwork just shines all the way through. The black and white flow of her…

Green Arrow, vol. 1: Quiver

The number of times I laughed out loud at this title (and they were too numerous to count) should not in any way detract from the seriousness of its issues or the craft of its creators. If anything, readers should…

Bulletproof Monk

I’ll be the first to admit that ever since I picked up Powers, I’ve thought Michael Avon Oeming is a god. I love the man’s style, and I am unashamed. So, in truth, I sought out this title not because…

Orbiter

I grew up with two physicists for parents. We often had great dinner conversations about subatomic particles and cosmology. When I was ten, I was allowed to stay up late to watch the first episode of Star Trek: The Next…

Kissing Chaos, vol. 1

Sometimes stories stick with you because of a particularly well turned phrase. Sometimes it’s the characters. With Kissing Chaos, like a lot of the great noir films, it sticks with you because of the murky atmosphere and slowly built feeling…

Days Like This

As Jamie Rich reminds us in his afterword, the idea that all musicians must write their own lyrics and melodies is, in actuality, a rather stupid idea. What many think of as some of greatest performers of all time didn’t…

Sinbad the Sailor

Anyone who’s ever yearned to travel the high seas and see unknown places may do well to read Sinbad’s account of his seven trips into the great beyond. An incurable wanderer, Sinbad can’t help but be pulled into adventure on…

Master Man: A Tall Tale of Nigeria

In this wonderful West African folktale, Shadusa believes he is by far the best man in town. And why not? He carries two antelope at once and everyone in town knows they’ve never seen anyone better. He strides about town…