Molly Danger

mollyMolly Danger looks like she’s ten but fights like she’s an M1 Abrams tank. With a Superman-esque origin story, her alien beginnings keep her appearance like a pre-adolescent human. Yet her super-strength and invulnerability make her the ideal weapon against the “Super-mechs,” super villains intent on conquering the world. She’s beguilingly innocent in behavior as well as looks, but her caretakers keep her away from humans to keep her from accidentally hurting anyone. Locked in a room that looks like a regular kid’s, Molly hungers for friends and any shred of normalcy.

The story follows the trail of many supers before it, though the pigtailed, feisty Molly is refreshing when compared to some of the hyper-sexualized super heroines that dominate much of the market. Other elements, like the reckless but brave law enforcement officer who defies commands to save the day and the semi-silly super villains, don’t feel particularly new. But the story is fun, Molly is sassy, and there are enough hints at future intrigues to make me want to pick up the next book.

In a picture book sized format, with extra space for panels, Molly Danger portrays a larger than life character. She has an 80’s vibe, with bright red Punky Brewster pigtails. Her face is expressive, illustrating her angst as well as carefree, child-like charm. She is a streak of color in a silver, semi-futuristic world. With distinct and detailed drawings, the book has a nice balance between the art and text. The illustrations’ crisp lines and changing angles give the book a cinematic feel.

Funded by a Kickstarter project, Molly Danger illustrates some of the new material that is now becoming available through crowd-sourced funding. This cute book seems aimed at those youngsters looking for a superhero role model. With a few mysteries set up in the story, I’m interested in seeing what happens to Molly next.

Molly Danger
by Jamal Igle
Art by Juan Castro, Romulo Fajardo Jr
ISBN: 9781939352408
Action Lab Entertainment, 2013