Bunny Drop, vol. 1-2

Thirty-year-old Daikichi is a bachelor who lives an ordinary life. But that life changes drastically when he returns home for his grandfather’s funeral. It seems that his grandfather had a young lover no one knew about. The woman is nowhere to be found, but she left behind a child. Rin is a quiet little girl who is drawn to Daikichi. When no one else in the family will assume responsibility, he spontaneously decides to take her in. Now his life is more chaotic as he learns the ins and outs of being a parent, but somehow being with Rin makes it all worth it.

Unita’s work won’t tell grown women anything they don’t already know: raising a family is a lot of work, especially when you’re a single parent. But that doesn’t mean that this sweet story isn’t worth reading or that it won’t be of interest to teen readers. It’s always touching to see a guy–especially one with a number of rough edges–brought low by the powers of one little child, especially a precocious and adorable one like Rin. Daikichi doesn’t try to be anything other than himself. He’s not good with the ladies; he doesn’t spend all of his time partying; he lives an ordinary life between work and time at home. When he discovers that his grandfather fathered a love child, he’s proud of the old man for still being “in the game,” so to speak. But he also can’t help but be moved by the serious demeanor of his newly discovered aunt. His decision to take her in says a lot about his character, especially how he feels about fair play and how to treat others. Glimpses of him at work help build a picture of him that is more than simply the slacker bachelor he believes himself to be….

This review was originally posted at Good Comics for Kids. Please visit the original post to see the rest of the review.

Bunny Drop, vol. 1-2
Yumi Unita
Volume One: ISBN 978-0-7595-3122-2
Volume Two: ISBN 978-0-7595-3119-2
Yen Press, 2010

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