Katman

Kit doesn’t care about much of anything. Life in his low-rent part of town is rough, but it mostly passes him by. Then one summer his brother kicks him out of the house for two hours and Kit discovers a world of homeless cats. Soon he is feeding almost twenty of them, which catches the eye of both his mother, who orders him to stop, and Jess, a cool girl who hangs out with a tough group of guys. As tensions build, Kit feels trapped between doing what is right for the cats and the local cat lady he befriends and doing what is easiest to get by in the world.

Pyle’s Katman succeeds because of its honesty. He doesn’t try to make it an after school special kind of story, where the choices are easy and right and wrong are clear. Almost no one in Kit’s world is doing much for the cats, so he could choose to also do nothing and he would be no different than the adults around him. But that choice would leave him miserable and guilt-ridden. By choosing to help the cats, though, he also chooses to lie, steal, and associate with people on the fringes of society, which makes it likely that he too will become an outcast. Pyle is careful to show that Kit is torn by what he must choose. Those around him are equally caught. The cat lady no longer trusts people, having learned that they will turn on you much quicker than a animal will. Kit’s mom and brother are simply trying to survive in a situation they hate. Jess and her friends are trying to be cool and fit in, while not wanting to fit in with everyone else. All of these emotions are real and believable and Pyle brings them fully to life….

This review was originally posted at Good Comics for Kids. Please visit the original post to see the rest of the review.

Katman
Kevin C. Pyle
ISBN: 978-0-8050-8285-2
Henry Holt, September 2009

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *